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  • Writer's pictureAmit Weiner

A Successful Music Career - 🎵 How to Thrive as a Musician

I know, the aspiration for a musical career is burning within you.


You're passionate about composing music, and it runs through your veins. Now, the question arises - how do you take your talent, and forge a path to success in the realm of music?


It's a query that defies a straightforward answer, but I'm eager to share two theories that can provide guidance, especially during challenging times or when you feel success is elusive, perhaps due to the absence of certain talents.



We've all experienced those moments, those periods of diminished self-esteem. Even I have encountered them. Trust me, even the renowned Hans Zimmer has grappled with such feelings. He openly admits that at the onset of each new film composition, he grapples with emotions of self-doubt, almost suggesting to the director to seek another, someone more earnest.





Here are two theories that might offer assistance:



1. "Thoughts Shape Reality"


The genesis lies in our thoughts. Napoleon Hill articulates this in his influential work "Think and Grow Rich," a perennially successful tome. At its core, the idea is that our thoughts emanate outward, prompting us to communicate differently, behave differently, and elicit varied reactions from those around us.


This echoes the sentiment found in "The Secret," whether you've perused the book or watched the cinematic rendition. In this context, I recommend cultivating a "success consciousness" – feel that you are successful, and witness how gradually those in your vicinity start perceiving you accordingly. It might sound peculiar and somewhat trite. How does feeling successful influence those around us?


It works. Observe the people in your sphere, and you'll discern that your thoughts about them reflect their self-perceptions.


Give it a shot! Share with me your experiences!


2. Self-Efficacy


A theory propounded by psychologist Albert Bandura, closely aligned with the previous one. Extensively validated in studies, this theory posits that an individual's belief in their capability to execute a task is a stronger predictor of their actual performance than those lacking such belief.


In essence, simply believing that you can play the piano, sing, or compose music for films is ample to enhance your performance in these tasks compared to those who lack such belief.


If all this seems a tad clichéd and akin to mere "chatter," ponder this example:


What defines a musician as "successful"?

Is it billions of streams on Spotify?

Concerts at Wembley Park with a crowd of 60,000?

Earnings amounting to a million dollars annually?

Appearances on television?


Note the myriad possibilities here, with the definition of a successful musician varying from person to person. Aviv Geffen is a successful musician but less so than Adele, for instance. Adele, in turn, is less successful than Paul McCartney, and the cycle continues.




In summary: The definition of a successful musician is fluid, determined by your interpretation of success.


Hence, embracing these two theories, viewing yourselves as successful musicians, and believing in your ability to be just that – these two facets alone may unlock the miracle! Suddenly, you stand as successful musicians!



To conclude, here's a captivating video where Hans Zimmer shares insights into his success and the process of composing music for "Dune."





Is it your first time here on this blog?





My name is Prof. Amit Weiner, a composer for film and TV and pianist, proudly leading the cross-disciplinary composition department at the globally recognized Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance.

I’m on a mission to help musicians find career opportunities and help musicians find their way in the huge world of the music industry.

With two decades of active composition experience, I find immense joy in teaching and sharing my knowledge and experiences.

My music is published by Universal, Sony, Warner, Megatrax, and more and I have received the Prime Minister's Prize for Composers in 2022.

I'm confident you'll not only enjoy but also find immense value in the content!



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